Advanced Placement Courses and Setting a Higher Bar

While educational institutions across the nation continue to improve the quality of training and learning offered to learners, one charitable organization that analyzes achievement notices that many learners who graduate are not prepared for college-level programs. In a review released, about three-quarters of the learners who took the ACT assessments did not achieve the ability needed in studying, math, English and science, according to a research of the results by the Associated Press.

advanced_placement_courses“The preparedness of learners leaves a lot to be desired,” Jon Erickson, chief executive of the Iowa-based business’s education and learning department, told the Associated Press. ACT describes preparedness as learners who can start college and learning or business educational institutions without having to take remedial classes. According to the Associated Press, “Of all ACT-tested high school graduates this year, 64 % met the English standard of 18 points.” In both studying and math, 44% of learners met the preparedness limit of 22 points. In science, 36% scored good enough to be considered prepared for a college biology course, or 23 points. Only 26% of learners met the standards for all four segments of the ACT test.”

Schools perform a big part in identifying how prepared learners are when they go off to college or business educational institutions. But learners and parents also perform a big part. Developing strong study habits early in a kid’s school years can serve them well down the road and parents who take an active part in their kid’s education and learning can repeat the importance of learning. Dedication to educational institutions also comes from the community and local government authorities that finance them. Schools that are able to offer more advanced placement courses help more learners prepare for their college years.

The latest ACT review on student accomplishment shows areas where we need to focus additional attention. Schools should not be assembly lines that learners are forced through without getting the training and learning they need to help them be successful in college or a trade school. Plus, as the cost of college increases, those remedial sessions add to the quantity that learners and families will be paying. We need to invest in our educational institutions, provide learners the tools they will need to be successful, offer advanced placement courses and ensure that when they graduate high school, they are prepared for their next step.

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