RN Certification

The American Nurses Association or ANA describes certification as “a means of calculating experience, and the recognition of qualified nursing staff that will enhance the public health for quality in medical care.” The ANA’s credentialing arm, the American Nurses Credentialing Center or ANCC, is the biggest nurse credentialing organization in the United States. More than a quarter million nursing staff has been certified by ANCC since 1991. ANCC’s Certification Program validates nurses’ skills, knowledge and capabilities, and are recognized and approved by all state boards of nursing and by the U.S. army. ANCC board certification encourages nursing staff within their professional field of activity and plays a role in better individual results.

The AACN or American Association of Critical Care Nurses provides its own credentialing system particularly for critical care nursing staff. Like the ANA/ANCC, an AACN qualification needs a determining evaluation and has its own set of specifications which RNs must fulfill to be able to take the credentialing exam. Crucial care nursing staff without baccalaureate levels in nursing are qualified to take the certification for mature, neonatal, and children’s critical care nursing staff (CCRN). The AACN also provides a clinical specialist credential (CCNS) for master’s ready RNs and nationwide acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs). AACN certification is legitimate for three years and is renewable.

Several expert nursing organizations comprising specialized places have their own credentialing applications. Some contest with the experience provided by the ANA/ANCC. Others provide experience for medical professionals in places of expertise for which the ANA/ANCC does not have an option.

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