The Advantages of Advanced Placement Courses

advancementOne important decision to make in high school is whether or not to take advanced placement courses, college-level classes taught in high school. According to Allen Grove, a college admissions expert, you should take advantage of the courses offered in your school. Taking advanced placement courses will benefit you in both the college application process and undergraduate life.

In a world where entering college is a challenge, taking the AP courses will give you that boost among other college applicants. Your academic record is the most important part of college application thus, succeeding in difficult courses is the surest sign of your preparedness for college which will then impress college admissions counselors.

Advanced placement courses require high-level calculation and critical thinking that you’ll encounter in your first year of college. Therefore, if you’ve successfully passed an AP course, you have developed college-level academic skills which in turn will lead you to a fruitful college life.

If you take enough AP courses, this will help you in saving money in the long run. You can potentially graduate a semester or even a year early which is a good idea for students who are not receiving financial aid. Instead of spending tens of thousands of dollars for another semester or year, graduating early is a great option.

Choosing a major sooner is also one of the benefits in taking advanced placement courses. Each course provides in-depth introduction to a specific subject area and a high score on an AP exam often fulfills one of a college’s general education requirements. Therefore, it will give you ample time to explore different academic fields.

Colleges also honor credits earned from taking advanced placement courses. With this, you can take more elective classes that serve your interests like glass blowing or the occult. You can also add a minor or second major more easily because AP credits will make it more feasible.

What is an Advanced Placement Courses?

Advanced Placement CoursesThe Advanced Placement courses are only found in the United States and Canada. This program is created by the College Board to offer a college-level curriculum and examinations for students in high school. The program provides credits to students who have advanced knowledge and skills in certain subjects. If the students finish the program and passed the examination, the colleges and universities supporting the program will grant placement and course credit.

Various subjects included in the program and examination has a specific AP curriculum designed by the College Board. The board is composed of highly competent individuals who work as college educators with specific expertise. Advanced Placement courses are college-level courses that can be taken by students in high school. Usually, the school offers these courses to students who are in their honor’s program, to those who have completed all the high school courses or to anyone who have high scores during the examination. These courses are usually courses in English and mathematics; however they can be any subject.

The courses are more meticulous as compared to high school courses since they are usually offered in college. As long as the students are able to finish the course with good grades, they will receive college credit for taking the courses. However, not all colleges grant students college credit for the courses. Some say that the AP courses only add stress to high school students. But you can’t take away the benefit the student will get once they finish the course. They will get a credit and will likely pay less when they go to college as well as save time. The Advanced Placement Courses are a great program and provides many opportunities and experiences for many high school students.

Advanced Placement Courses Restriction

The Advanced Placement (AP) is a program in the United States and North America designed by the College Board, providing college-level courses and exams to kids. United States universities often allow placement and course credit to learners who acquire high grades above a certain number on the exams. The AP program for the various topics is designed for the College Board by a panel of professionals and college-level teachers in each topic. For a secondary school course to have the AP status, the course must be audited by the College Board to determine it meets the AP program. If the course is accepted, the university may use the AP status and the course will be openly listed on the AP Ledger.

advanced_placement_coursesWalter Fields and his spouse are extremely pleased of their little girl, a sophomore at Columbia High School in Maplewood, New Jersey, an excellent mathematics student, scoring proficiency on state assessments and making an A in 8th grade geometry. However, she was not recommended for 9th grade geometry, a course that would keep her on track for Advanced Placement calculus on her senior year. With a heavy sports schedule, she did not do as well in Algebra the next year and her instructor recommended she choose sports or math, informing her mother and father, she does not “get it.”

The Fields, well-educated African Americans, believe the college has restricted their little girl’s improvement because of competition and, with other parents, are planning a court action. Fifty six percent of Columbia’s learners are black, yet only 14.4% took Advanced Placement Courses in Calculus. The Washington Post reviews that some educational institutions limit Advanced Placement courses access to show a high rate of success, while some good students in math, science and engineering are losing out.

Advanced Placement Courses in Other States

Possibilities keep increasing for kids to have greater access to college-level advanced placement courses throughout Des Moines, as the school district will be providing new programs at Central Academy while continuing other AP programs available at all five extensive great academic institutions. These changes result from significant registration increases the school district has seen recently in advanced placement courses as both learners and instructors have stepped up to meet the task of this college-level program.

advanced_placement_coursesDMPS is pleased to declare, for the first time ever, four new AP programs to be provided to Des Moines learners through Central Academy beginning with the 2014-15 school year: AP Art History, AP Computer Science, AP Microeconomics, and AP Spanish Literature. These new AP promotions are unique, specific programs that will be available only at Central Academy to be able to provide access to all DMPS learners. (Previously, AP Art History and AP Microeconomics were available only to learners at Roosevelt High School.) In order to accomplish the growth of their advanced placement program at Central Academy, DMPS will reduce some replication of AP programs. From 2014-15, AP Environmental Science, AP Statistics, and AP US Government will no longer be provided at Central Academy but will continue to be provided at all five comprehensive high schools.

“Des Moines Public Schools is a leader in Iowa and the country when it comes to providing learners access to high-level academic programs, such as Advanced Placement and our learners are to be recommended for taking on these world-class academic opportunities,” said Superintendent Tom Ahart. “The school district’s effort to make advanced placement courses available to more and more learners throughout Des Moines is showing that our learners and instructors are stepping up to the task. We are providing thousands of learners access to class that will help prepare them for higher education and beyond.”

Increase in Advanced Placement Courses Enrollment

Jefferson County Public Schools is constantly on the pattern up-wards in the number of learners enrolled in Advanced Placement Courses and taking the associated examinations. In JCPS, about half of the AP assessments taken obtained ratings that allow learners to earn higher education and learning credit at many higher education and learning institutions, an advantage of the advanced placement course program, but the passing rate dropped this season after several years of benefits.

JCPS authorities say that is likely because the region has targeted on increasing the advanced placement course contribution of learners and now, it’ll need to focus on issues such as instructor planning that support learning within those programs. “Kids cannot do well on the test unless they take the class,” says Pam Royster, the district’s higher education and learning and career ready professional. The number of learners taking AP examinations improved 4.2% last school year from 4,952 this year to 5,160 in 2013. The number of assessments taken (one college student can be registered in several AP programs and take several AP exams) also improved 3.6% from 7,762 the season before to 8,043. But the passing rate reduced by 1.9 percentage points to 47.8% in 2013.

“We’ve definitely got some work to do to make sure we’re covering the content and we’re going deeply enough for kids to be successful on the test,” Royster says. Last school year, JCPS signed up with the state-wide Advance Kentucky effort that helps provide training and resources to instructors and schools to increase the number of AP contribution. That program has been recognized by the state and region as having had a significant effect on AP enhancement. Last year, Valley, Moore and Waggener high schools started participating in the Advance Kentucky. Fern Creek, Southern and Seneca high schools signed up with them this year. The system, says Royster, is a multi-year effort to develop instructors and supports, so it could take time to see its effect.

Advanced Placement Courses Role

Learners in high school have many choices in terms of seeking the kinds of training they want. Many regions offer Magnet Programs that provide improved knowledge in specific areas (Arts, Science) which students are keen on seeking later on. Other educational institutions have implemented the International Baccalaureate Program, which has become highly popular, for its focus on separate, globally-minded query. There is also Advanced Placement Courses, a traditional mainstay of high school improved program.

Advanced Placement CoursesThere was lately interesting news brief on the current state of Advanced Placement Courses in United States public education. The piece stated that 1 in 3 United States High Schooler’s, in public educational institutions, took an Advanced Placement Courses Examination this year. Of that, 33% of High Schoolers, 1 in 5 received a passing score on the test. These are really quite impressive numbers. First, a third of United States, openly educated students is seeking advanced instructors in high school, presumably, on their own accord, though with the support of their family and instructors. Second, the opportunity to engage in serious work in United States educational institutions is available, and with knowledge of what is out there, students have real opportunities. One third of scholars are certain enough, during high school, that educational accomplishment is really important and that the work they put in during high school will pay off in college.

And, it will. A passing score on an AP Examination is worth a credit at most colleges, amounting to a significant savings in money. Enough time spent in high school can be an appealing factor in higher education and kids realize this. Significantly, Advanced Placement Courses is a wide effort and covers topics from Math to English to the Arts with many areas of expertise in between. There were 34 different subject examinations given most lately, indicating the breadth and depth this method has achieved. After all, this is a high school program with 34 college degree course choices.