You Can’t Do That

No, I’m not referring to the B side of the Beatles album “Can’t Buy Me Love.” Many of you may have minimal knowledge of the Beatles, let alone their music. For the record, I’m in the group that lived through the British Invasion in the mid-1960s; no, that was not a military operation. I’m referring to a far too common phrase that many of us have heard in our lifetime, and worse yet, may have said to a friend or even our children. This is a psychological seed that should never be planted. While it’s true that there certainly are things we should not do in life, let’s focus for a moment on those fantastic things that we could do.

 

Let me share an example of what I mean. My youngest was born profoundly deaf, so we decided to allow her to attend a residential school out of state that was very progressive. Because most of the children, including my own, had cochlear implants, this school helped these children perfect (as best they could) their listening and speaking skills. The results were astounding. As we were doing our exit interview near the end of the elementary school years, we met with the school psychologist, and I’ll never forget what she told our daughter and us. She said we should have realistic expectations regarding what to expect from our child as she grows up. The example she gave was in the field of nursing. She said, “If your daughter decides she wants to be a nurse, she will most likely become an LPN rather than an RN.”

 

When I left that meeting and that school, I was somewhat bewildered. For five years, my daughter was taught that she could do anything, and we also believed that. We had never told our child that there was anything she could not do. Time passed, and we forgot that advice. High school ended, then on to her bachelor’s degree, followed by her master’s, and today, she is completing her thesis for her EdD at a major university. She holds a very responsible position in state government, is married, and is a homeowner. Contrary to conventional wisdom, she learned, and we supported the belief that we can accomplish almost anything of value we set our minds to and are willing to work for.

 

Unfortunately, some children have minimal confidence and belief in their abilities. It’s not unusual for a child to say, “I can’t do it!” Physical limitations may exist, but we should be our kiddo’s biggest cheerleaders. When they say this, we might try encouraging them by offering one of the following responses:

 

  1. “I know this is hard for you.” Above all, listen to your children, and let them open up and discuss the issue.
  2. “Have I ever told you about…” Please talk about your struggles or those of others close to them and encourage them to do their best. I know my daughter has a story to tell.
  3. “You can’t do this yet.” The word “yet” allows you to talk about what can happen.

 

There is no end to studies written on this topic, and I do not profess to have all the answers, but I do remember the limiting belief we could have fallen victim to years ago. We chose not to, and I hope if you are ever faced with a similar situation regarding your future, your hopes, and dreams, or those of your child, you will overcome them as well.

 

Written By: Dave Christy

Why Are Gen Eds Required for My Degree and How Can I Save Time and Money Completing Them?

If you’ve never been to college, you may ask yourself that question. Most people would much rather focus on courses that relate specifically to their chosen field of study and their career choice. The reality is that colleges and universities require from 30% to 50% of coursework to be general electives (gen eds). I know when I was younger and began my degree in engineering, I was anxious to start my core classes, but I soon learned that those courses would begin in the fourth or fifth semester. Many students may question whether gen eds are a waste of time, but is that true? First of all, all university programs require gen ed courses, so you are working your way toward your final goal. Secondly, you will learn new subjects, and you may develop a new passion. Elective courses also allow you to explore topics that interest you.

Colleges and universities want “well-rounded” graduates, and gen eds provide a comprehensive education. They promote critical thinking across multiple subjects. General education is more than what it is often perceived to be. Fundamentally, the purpose of education is not to train a student for a specific job but equips them with the skills they need to live life (Walters & Bockorn, 2018).

Once I started my gen ed curriculum, it began to make sense. I was experiencing high-level learning and then saw the value of these courses. For those of you who may not have any experience with post-secondary education, and those with limited knowledge of this subject, here are some examples of general education courses by category:

English Language and Literature:

College Composition, Oral Communication

Arts and Humanities:                                   

Arts, Music, Philosophy, Religion, Ethics, History

Social Sciences:                                    

Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, Economics

Natural Science:                                            

Chemistry, Biology, Anatomy & Physiology, Microbiology

Mathematics:                                                

Algebra, Geometry, Calculus, Statistics

So, we understand that gen eds are required and why, but how can we expedite the completion of these courses and save money? I’ve found that most colleges and universities nationwide provide access to and accept virtually the same courses to satisfy this requirement. One very good and very affordable option for completing these courses in the shortest time possible and for the lowest cost is through Distance Learning Systems.

Here are some of the benefits of utilizing Distance Learning Systems to satisfy this requirement.

  1. Distance Learning Systems provide a wide assortment of general education courses that satisfy most, if not all, general education requirements.
  2. All courses provided by Distance Learning Systems are ACE (American Council on Education) recommended.
  3. Distance Learning Systems has partnership agreements with over 30 of the nation’s finest universities. This guarantees the transferability of all courses completed with Distance Learning Systems into the degree-granting institution.
  4. All courses are delivered 100% online 24/7.
  5. Distance Learning Systems provide an accelerated path to over 450 online degree programs.
  6. The cost of these courses is about 56% less expensive than the average cost of university tuition.
  7. You have options when beginning a new program or returning to complete your degree. I absolutely see and appreciate the value of these general education courses, but my position has always been and will always be to maximize value and minimize time. Good luck!

 

Written By: Dave Christy

Still Waiting for the Right Time to Start College?

 

Procrastination is the killer of dreams! As a national education company owner, I witness this sad reality every day. For a year, we are contacted by as many as 20,000 adults who have unrealized dreams. This is because they, like many others, have put off the most critical tool for personal, professional, and financial growth…education.

 

There are as many reasons people delay education as there are people, but many tell us they are simply afraid. Perhaps it could be fear of failure, the ever-increasing cost of education, or simply going back and competing in the classroom with students half their age. But you must remember that it’s okay, it’s normal to feel that way, you’ll be fine.

 

Any student at any age contemplating going back to school should start by focusing on why they want to return to school. What is your WHY? I’m guessing it’s more important than your fear. Maintain that focus, establish short- and long-term goals, and remember, the secret to success is getting started. For a moment, overcoming that fear is often more difficult than completing the task. It’s important to note that over 20% of today’s college enrollments are students over 25 (Education Data Initiative); hundreds of thousands of people just like you are doing this, and so can you!

 

Distance Learning Systems has worked with adult students for over 22 years. During that time, it has structured an accelerated and affordable path to earning up to 2 years of college credit, entirely at home and 100% online. That means you can finish the first two years of college at half the cost of traditional education and in about half the time. After saving time and money in the Distance Learning Systems proven program, they will assist you in transferring your credits into one of their 32 accredited universities, where you’ll have over 450 fully online programs.

 

Here are just a few of the available degree programs:

 

Registered Nursing

Aviation-Professional Pilot

Homeland Security

Crime Scene Investigation

Investigative Forensics

Software Development

Sports Management

Cyber Security

Biotechnology

Counter Terrorism

Business Psychology

 

Your degree will be awarded by one of the top universities in the nation, and as a student of Distance Learning Systems, you may be awarded scholarships and/or reduced tuition through graduation.

 

I want to encourage you not to fear your exciting journey to personal and professional success. Please don’t look back 20, 30, or 40 years from now and realize what could have been. You’ve got this!

 

Written By: Dave Christy

The Fastest and Most Affordable Path to a College Degree — Regardless of Your Major

It’s no secret that the cost of education continues to increase year after year. Education Data Initiative reported in January 2022,” The average price of college tuition & fees at public 4-year institutions has risen 179.2% over the last 20 years for an average annual increase of 9.0%.” In most cases, wages haven’t kept pace with the cost of higher ed, so what can a prospective college student do to offset some of this cost? I want to share what I’ve learned that may help you save $10,000 to $40,000 or more!

 

Years ago, I found similarities in university degree programs, on-campus or online; most programs require several general education courses. These courses may account for up to 2 years of a 4-year degree. While that number may be smaller in programs such as medicine and engineering, tuition for these courses costs no less than those in the major area of study.

 

General education courses are required for most undergraduate degree programs. They do not change based on the major. While there are literally hundreds of college majors, most need the same general education courses. You should consult your school to determine what they require.

 

I’ve taken advantage of programs offering a cost-effective solution to this coursework for my children and grandchildren. They did not need to sacrifice the quality or transferability of these courses as they navigated their program, and we’ve saved thousands of dollars literally in the process.

 

Here are some examples of general education courses:

  • Music
  • Art
  • Philosophy
  • English Composition
  • English Literature
  • Foreign Language
  • Western Civilization
  • US History
  • Math
  • Statistics
  • Sciences
  • Sociology
  • Public Speaking
  • Psychology
  • World Religions
  • Anthropology

 

Distance Learning System offers a program you may want to consider. They provide 100% online courses that are recognized by the American Council on Education and accepted by over 30 of their top-tier university partners. These online courses cost less than half the national average and are completed online in about half the time of traditional college courses. My position has always been, why pay more for the same thing? My answer has always been that I shouldn’t.

 

If you can save 60% to 80% on the first two years of your 4-year degree and receive the same quality education, why not take advantage of the opportunity? These programs are open to high school students preparing for college or working adults interested in fast-tracking their career and income potential. Good luck in your quest for higher education.

 

Written By: Dave Christy

5 Reasons You Must Go to College

Much has been written about college versus the trades, work versus school, and other similar comparisons. I’ve heard so many young people say they want their own place, a new car, toys; you name it. Very seldom do you hear a young person these days say, “I can’t wait to go to college!” And yet, that remains the primary source for acquiring all those other things they want out of life.

 

Is college important? Absolutely! What about going into the trades; is that a good option for young people? Absolutely! But, regardless of a young person’s path, the college experience provides a solid foundation in life and business. There are so many options available to post-secondary education students; the real dilemma might be where to attend and what to study rather than whether I should get a college degree. Of course, you should. Education has no downside, and it is important to remember that knowledge is power.

 

So, what are some of the advantages of earning a college degree?

  1. You’ll earn more over your lifetime. The BLS confirms that workers with a bachelor’s degree earn a median income of $524 per week more than workers with only a high school diploma. That’s an increase of more than $27,000 a year. That translates to a lifestyle change for the college graduate.
  2. Reduced chance of unemployment. Even though not required for some positions, a college degree is NOT ignored by future employers. As an employer myself, I understand and appreciate the discipline and hard work needed to complete a college education, and I absolutely factor that in when evaluating prospective employees.
  3. According to a 2016 Pew Research Center report, workers with a bachelor’s degree or more advanced education were 70% more likely to view their job as a career than just 39% of workers without college. The bottom line, college-educated workers experience greater job satisfaction.
  4. While the other reasons for earning a college degree are statistically impactful, there are other more personal reasons to earn a college degree. The Lumina Foundation determined that college graduates may demonstrate healthier habits than those without a degree. It may be hard to believe, but your education can directly impact your health.
  5. According to findings by the Lumina Foundation, 94% of adults with a bachelor’s degree or higher reported being very happy with life, compared to 89% with no college education.

 

There isn’t a downside to acquiring post-secondary education. Time spent earning that degree will give the young person an opportunity to mature, learn, make more, and secure their future. A college degree may translate to achieving a lifelong dream with countless personal and financial rewards for the mature adult.

 

At Distance Learning Systems, we speak to incoming adult students every day. Some may require retraining for a new career, others may need a degree to upgrade within their chosen profession, and others may wish to achieve personal goals. Our 30+ university partners offer over 450 fully online degrees, and we can help you save significant time and money. Whatever your reason for considering college, we wish you the very best and want to encourage you to take advantage of some of the world’s finest institutions of higher learning.

 

Written By: Dave Christy

Ever Dreamed of Becoming an Airline Pilot?

 

It may be faster and easier than you think!

If you’ve traveled lately or even watched the news regarding airline travel over the July 4th weekend, you certainly know there is a shortage of airline pilots. Most sources say there are about 14,000 openings for commercial pilots annually—results of many things, including buyouts over COVID-19, the return of pre-pandemic air traffic levels, and more. The jobs are available, and airlines are scrambling to fill them, but it’s an uphill battle. If you have ever dreamed of becoming an airline pilot, I advise DO IT NOW!

____________________________________________

Here are some of the most popular reasons to become a commercial airline pilot:

  1. Indescribable fun flying an aircraft (might as well have fun at work, right?)
  2. Flexible schedule
  3. Live where you want
  4. Dynamic work environment (no two days are the same)
  5. Travel benefits for you, your family, and friends
  6. Public perception (who doesn’t look at an airline pilot when boarding and think, what a fantastic job)
  7. Very High Income: Seniority translates to higher pay, choice schedules, and quality of life

____________________________________________

You would be hard-pressed to find a more secure profession with higher pay and a more exciting lifestyle than an airline pilot…and you can do this! I remember how I felt when I did my first solo flight; there is simply nothing as emotionally satisfying as pulling back on the yoke and lifting off—an incredible sensation.

Income

The pay and benefits of being a commercial airline pilot are pretty hard to beat. Aside from the travel and other benefits, you’ll receive as a commercial pilot; your income will firmly place you in a profession that provides an exceptional lifestyle. While the average annual wage for a commercial pilot in 2018 was $130,059 (CHRON), the yearly income for captains with Delta, Southwest, FedEx, and others with experience can eclipse $300,000 annually. Lots of fun – Lots of travel – Lots of money!

How do I get there? 

To become a commercial pilot with an airline, you’ll be required to earn a bachelor’s degree. Here’s the good news. Distance Learning Systems and our university partners offer a fully online bachelor’s degree in aviation. You will begin your program with Distance Learning Systems, save about half the typical tuition, and complete your courses 100% online in about half the time. You’ll also receive a discount on the remainder of your bachelor’s degree. You’ll have access to a flight center near your home where you’ll do your flight training (the most fun you’ll ever have). As you complete your degree and flight training, you’ll receive a private pilot license, instrument rating, flight instructor status, and commercial pilot license. You can even earn money as an instructor while you complete your program!

If this is your dream, we encourage you to contact us today! Classes start weekly, and we’d love to get you started on this incredible journey.

 

Written by Dave Christy

How to Choose an Online School

Today, with the advancement in technology and the rising costs of education, more and more people seek to earn a degree online. We understand that traditional education may not be for everyone. 

People have families, jobs, or obligations that keep them busy throughout the day, so earning a degree online is another way to achieve their educational goals without ever stepping onto campus. If you think you are one of these people, selecting an online college or university to earn your degree can be stressful and challenging for some to navigate. 

There can be many different things to consider when choosing the best online school for you, so we’ve put together a list of 3 helpful and quick tips for choosing an online university or college.

 

Tip #1: Choose an Accredited School

Earning a degree from an accredited school is essential because it helps determine if a college or university meets or exceeds minimum quality standards and maintains specific educational standards. It would be best if you took the time to research accredited colleges and universities that offer online degrees, which could impact your future career. An excellent place to start your research is on the U.S. Department of Education website https://www.ed.gov/accreditation. If researching is not something you have the time for, some online education providers customize paths to earning a degree online from an accredited school. 

Tip #2: Make Sure its 100% Online

Deciding on your major is an important decision, along with the school you choose, and not every university or college makes all of their majors available online. This can make it tricky for those who want to earn a degree online for the career they want to pursue. Some degree programs can be hybrid, a mix of online and on-campus courses, and not 100% online. If you know the degree you want, you will want to verify that your degree and classes are all online. If you are unsure of your major, there are online education providers that offer Gen Ed and General Elective courses that you can earn college credits and transfer those credits towards hundreds of different degree programs.

Tip #3: Research Costs and Admission Requirements

The cost of education and the admission requirements can be a big hurdle to clear. Investing in your education is an investment in yourself and your future. Still, you’ll want to start by comparing tuition costs, other fees, financial aid, and checking admission requirements. Also, ensure you don’t miss additional expenses such as course fees, textbook fees, course materials, labs, and technology fees. If evaluating the costs and admission requirements becomes too confusing or daunting, there are online education providers that will help you better understand the cost and admission requirements for obtaining your degree from an online school.

 

 Following these tips will equip you with the information you need to find the best online college or university or choose help from an online education provider. Distance Learning Systems is one online education provider that helps students enroll in some of the nation’s top online colleges and universities. Also known as DLSI, Distance Learning Systems is a premier provider of coursework that satisfies degree requirements for regionally accredited university partners. 

 

Written by Justin Hart

20 Shocking Facts About Nursing

  1. Ellen Dougherty was the first to be registered on January 10, 1902. She was the first Registered Nurse in the World.
  2. After 1905, it became a misdemeanor to claim to be an RN without a certificate of registration.
  3. Only 3 of 5 nurses actually work in hospitals. Some non-hospital nursing careers include nurse-midwife, forensic nurse, nurse educator, school nurse, academic nurse writer, and legal nurse consultant.
  4. Nurses walk 4 miles every shift! On average, nurses walk four to five miles every 12-hour shift they work. The average person only walks about 2.5 miles a day. Nurses walk double the distance every shift than the average population does daily. This interesting fact about nursing proves why nurses need a comfortable pair of shoes!
  5. Nursing is considered the most honest and ethical profession in the United States! Every year, Gallup asks U.S. adults to rate the honesty and ethics of a number of professions, and for 18 years in a row, Americans overwhelmingly rate nurses as the most honest and ethical.
  6. The first known nursing school was established in India in 250 BCE. However, only male students could attend nursing school at the time.
  7. Linda Richards was the first American to earn a nursing degree. She enrolled in the new nursing program at the New England Hospital for Women and Children, was the program’s first graduate in 1873.
  8. The famous poet Walt Whitman, worked as a volunteer nurse during the Civil War! “The Wound Dresser” was just one of his pieces that reflected on his experience.
  9. Nursing is a fast-growing profession. The federal government predicts that 200,000 new nursing jobs will be created each year between 2016 and 2026. That’s 2 million nursing positions!
  10. Men are a growing portion of nurses in the United States. In 2018, men made up 9.6% of the total nursing population which was an increase from 7.1% in 2008.
  11. The first documented travel nurses were present in the late 1970s when nurses were brought to New Orleans specifically to help care for the surge of people present for Mardi Gras. 
  12. As of October 2020, the pass rate for the NCLEX was 74.73%.
  13. Most of the women (90%) who served in the Vietnam War were Army and Navy nurses.
  14. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, only about 84,200 RNs are employed as school nurses: enough to staff just 64% of schools with a full-time nurse. However, many nurses are responsible for covering multiple schools, or they work part-time.
  15.  As of 2020, there were 2,986,500 working in the United States.
  16. The average annual earnings for licensed practical nurses was $29,440 in 2000. In 2020, the average annual earnings were $48,500.
  17. Mary Eliza Mahoney was the first professionally trained and licensed African American nurse in the U.S. She went on to co-found the National Association of Colored Graduate Nurses (NACGN).
  18. Accelerated-degree programs are making it easier for people to go into nursing as a second career. As of 2018, there were 282 accelerated baccalaureate programs, according to the AACN, with 30 more in the works.
  19. Last year, 30,390 nurses were accepted into university. According to the UCAS, 2019 saw an increase of 6.1% of nursing course applications.
  20. There is a serious shortage of nurses. Despite the facts revealing that more nurses are joining the register and more students are choosing to study nursing, there is a global shortage of nurses.

We’d Like to Hear From You!

To those of you that read these blogs consistently, thank you so much. Having an audience rather than feeling like I am writing into the void is a rewarding experience, so again, thank you. Seeing the reactions to articles, stories and interviews never gets less heartwarming for me. Especially when I can relate to even just one person.

Now I typically write about different topics that I come up with or that seem like a good fit at the moment, but now I want to hear from you guys! To our students, prospective students, and just general followers of our page, what do you want to read about?

We get great feedback especially when I do interviews and personal pieces. So, what type of topic would be personal to you? Do you need motivation? Time management tips? More information on the nursing field? Or would you like to hear about different job opportunities in different areas of study? Let us know!

Leave a comment on this post telling us what you would like to hear next. I’m all ears!

– Lucy

Letters to Yourself: A Gift for Graduation Day

Have you written a letter to your future self before? When I was in eighth grade, I had a history teacher that had us write a letter to our future selves, which would be opened at a later date close to high school graduation. We were instructed to write about our current hobbies, favorite music, friends, and our future hopes and goals. I wrote about how my volleyball and track seasons were going and how I hoped one day I would be a college athlete. I wrote about the Black Eyed Peas and how much I loved them and my favorite songs. Cringey, right? I finished my letter by telling my future self what I hoped I would accomplish in the next four years and reminded future me to not be so hard on myself.

Over the course of the next few years, I forgot all about the letter I wrote, until the day before graduation when I finally was able to read it. When I unsealed the letter and read what 13 year old me had written, I laughed and cringed and eventually was brought to tears. I was shocked by what had changed, but thankful for the personal growth I saw. I was heading to college to major in Secondary Education and as a member of my university’s volleyball team. I no longer listened to the Black Eyed Peas (except for the occasional throwback), and I was still working on being an advocate for myself and finding my voice. The letter was such a breath of fresh air, I then came up with the idea of writing a letter to my future self for when I graduated college. Being 17, my goals for the future were different. I sat down and wrote another letter to myself, this time, to open the day before I graduated from college.

Three years later, I unsealed yet another letter from myself. The emotions I felt while reading that letter were indescribable. My younger self had written about how I was nervous to leave home, moving to a place where I didn’t know a soul.

She was scared of living up to the standards she had set for herself but was determined to make her family proud. The last thing she wrote about was finding happiness.

Younger me had been struggling with knowing where she belonged and just wanted to find her place in this world. Reading my final letter urged me to reflect on my past three years. Three years full of switching majors, an athletic career cut short by injury, one too many crazy hair phases, gaining lifetime friends, goals I reached and even the ones I fell short on. Reading my letter made me more conscious of how I have changed and grown. It reminded me of some of my past visions that I lost track of along the way. It made me appreciate how far I have come and it made me look forward to the future.

Memories tend to fade and become distorted over time, making them unreliable by the time you graduate. It’s far better to put pen to paper and write down all of your hopes and dreams, your visions and aspirations, as well as ask some mindful questions that only your future self can answer.

As you write your letter, your current thoughts and consciousness will be stored in your words. And as you read it after graduation, months or years later, you will be provided with a different perspective, letting you see just how much you have changed since then. Write to yourself. Include your goals and your fears. Ask yourself questions, and offer advice to your future self. There are no restrictions on how far you should project your letter to — you can write to your future self 1 year, 3 years, 5 years, or even 10 years from now!

A few quick few prompts to start your letter could be…
  1. Ambitious: “In (number of years) I would like to achieve…”
  2. Goal-driven: “My goal for (date/year) is…”
  3. Motivating: “Dear future self, I would like to encourage/motivate you to…”