Nursing and the Schools of Psychology

Studying the mind and its corresponding behaviors are the concerns of psychology.  Psychology establishes general assumptions through research; methods that have its own affinity with the study of nursing. Psychology may only be an increment to the nursing profession; but even before its insertion into the nursing course, nurses have already been using psychological techniques in treating their patients. This has been manifested through the schools of thought that psychology employs to its patients. Let us examine a few of these schools of thought that has already found its expression in the nursing field.

psychologyThe Biological School
The biological matters that compose the human brain have an effect on the human behavior. If a nurse is aware of this, then they will be able to properly manage the patient. The nurse will also be able to keep in mind certain physiological reactions that can be expected from the patient.

 The Behavioral School
As has been said, psychology concerns itself with human behavior. Nurses should be able to determine behavioral patterns from the patient they is handling. If a nurse has the capacity go over the patient’s demeanor, then they has taken the first step towards treating the patient well.

The Cognitive School
Mental processes that manifest through human activity should be part of a nurse’s agenda of concern. As the saying goes, “actions speak louder than words.” If a nurse has a knack for determining peculiar behaviors within his/her patient, then both the nurse and the patient benefit from the professional’s good awareness.

The Social School
Like Psychology, the inclusion of Sociology to the nursing curriculum enables nurses to see attitudes in their patients based on their sociological status. This helps nurses create a complete assessment of their patients’ conditions.

The Psychoanalytic School
Ever since Freud introduced the study of psychoanalysis, it has become a part of every department in every office, including the nursing department. The analysis that goes about it is crucial in giving enough evaluation over a patient.

Three Effective Strategies To Improve Your Grade In College Subjects

38f3d458b2c1443097fa53d69b1decaeThe manner of education in college is quite different from high school. A lot of college professors give lessons to student in a different approach. Often time they just provide a list of reference where students can read lessons about the subject. College professors, most of the time impose personal research and study to students than an in depth teaching class. This is one of the major reasons why a student flunk to some college subjects like Anatomy & Physiology.

Some students would find it hard to adjust from a high school “spoon-feed” method of learning, to a highly independent college instruction strategy. Passing or getting a good grade in a college subject can be very difficult to an unadjusted student. It’s best that a college student adapt to a more independent teaching method. Here are other three effective strategies to help a student achieve a high grade in difficult college subjects:

Create a Habit to Study Your Lessons in Advance
Preparing for the next day’s lessons would be the wisest thing to do. Read and study the lessons in advance. Studying in advance will provide you more time to deeply learn the lesson. This will also allow you to coup up with the professor’s lesson for the next day.

Participate in Study Groups
Another effective way for learning lesson in difficult subjects like Psychology is thru conducting group studies. Students help each other in studying the lessons in the subject. They can share thoughts and ideas about a specific topic in the lesson to other students.

Tutorial Classes
You can also hire a highly knowledgeable individual that can help learn and study your lessons well. Hiring tutors can reinforce your learning about the lessons in Anatomy & Physiology or Psychology subjects. They can also provide you with an in-depth teaching method that you need in order to fully understand the lessons in difficult college subjects.

Reasons To Study Psychology

PsychologyThere have been a lot of criticisms that Psychology has received over the years, as a college major and as a career path. Reasons ranging from “it’s not useful” to “It’s just easy and fun” as a college major. People also criticize Psychology as having a low pay and few jobs.

But there are many positive reasons to study Psychology, even if you do not plan to become a Psychology major or work in a Psychology-related profession. Reasons that go beyond career possibilities because it is all around you and touches on every aspect of your life.

One of the reasons to study Psychology is that it can help you better understand yourself and the people around you. You might find yourself gaining a deeper understanding of the many influences that have impacted your own life because you will learn more about how development occurs, how personality forms, and how society and culture impact behavior. Moreover, you might be able to understand the influences and motivations when someone behaves in certain way.

Psychology’s emphasis is on research methods and statistics. This will give you a good grasp of these methods that will contribute greatly on the success of your career, regardless whether you pursue a career in Psychology or somewhere else.

You will also develop your critical thinking skills by studying Psychology. A great deal of topics such as the scientific method, decision-making, and problem-solving are what you study in Psychology. These topics help hone your ability to think deeply and critically about different issues, which is considered to be essential to being an educated person.

There are still a lot of reasons to study Psychology. At best, it can help you better understand who you are, how you will be, and your interaction with your family, friends, and strangers. Aside from that, graduates with Psychology degrees end up in a wide array of occupations.

Psychology and Memory

Psychology derives from Greek roots meaning study of the psyche, or soul. It is defined as the study of the mind and behavior. Psychology, as defined by the American Psychological Association, is an academic discipline and an applied science which seeks to understand individuals and groups by establishing general principles and researching specific areas.

With Psychology as the study of the mind, it leads us to memory. One function of the mind is to store and remember information. Memory is the sum total of what we remember, and gives us the capability to learn and adapt from previous experiences as well as build relationships.

However, our memory is not perfect or immune to errors. Sometimes we forget things from important to mundane that, one way or another, play such a pervasive and pivotal role in our daily lives. For example, forgetting a friend’s birthday or misplacing an important document.

DLS 2Daniel L. Schacter, psychologist and memory expert, presented a framework designed to outline the seven major “sins” of memory in his book, “The Seven Sins of Memory.” These seven “sins” are transience, absent-mindedness, blocking, mis-attribution, suggestibility, bias and persistence.

Schacter describes the first three sins as those of omission (the memory is lost). Our memory fades over time, is easily distracted that is why we become absent-minded, and is blocked because we struggle to remember things when we know that we know it in the first place.

The last four sins Schacter describes as the sins of commission (at least some of the memory is there, but it is either wrong or unwanted. Our memory mistakes its source, is influenced by outside factors which triggers false memories, is influence by our current beliefs, and remembers things that we would rather forget.

Although our memory is not perfect, it allows us to adapt and interact in a world full of overwhelming information.

Psychology in Medical Education

Psychologists have to acquire a much better knowledge of the fundamental biological sciences if they wish to engage in a much bigger position in educating medical students, and take part in study and treatment inside the health care process.

Health-related schools are switching from being organized on biologically based departments to multidisciplinary organizations, and that study funded by the National Institutes of Health is requiring a much more interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary strategy. These changes generate a chance for psychology to play a better role in medical instruction and health investigation.

psychologyThe inability for making psychology highly relevant to the biological fundamentals of medicine can lead to psychology getting minimally highly relevant to medical education and practice. For instance, a psychologist who would like to work in an interdisciplinary treatment plan targeting cancer must provide expertise about a few of the behavioral aspects in the start of cancer – but should know something about oncology and defense mechanisms function, as well.

Definitely, in order to comprehend and educate about these topics, it is essential that we have a number of this fundamental knowledge. There’s a necessity for clinical health psychologists to understand more about anatomy, physiology and pharmacology. For college students studying to become pharmacists for example, psychology offers quite a bit to educate about patient decision-making, social support and problem management and self-care. For example, research has discovered that asking a patient, “Any questions?” when they pick up a prescription decreases the likelihood that a patient will in fact ask a question. By contrast, asking, “What questions do you have?” results in more connection between patient and pharmacist.

Psychologists may also provide important communication instruction on how to build a connection with patients – whether it’s working with children who won’t sit still in the chair or adults who become stressed when dealing with a dental appointment.

A lot more has to be completed to help make education and training possibilities readily available for psychologists within educational health centers.

Psychology of Embarrassment

Embarrassment is a key individual feeling that we’ve all experienced, usually at the price of our own pride. It’s a condition of self-conscious problems that causes many of us to go red. And it’s something most of us give our very best to prevent. The APA’s Monitor has an exciting content this month, looking into the psychology of embarrassment and the analysis behind it. Embarrassment can act as a highly effective and valuable social bond enriching our public connections with others. But it can also have a down part, as we try to prevent it, sometimes at the price of our own wellness or pleasure. While there is little we can do to end embarrassment in every scenario, we can better comprehend the objective it provides in our psychological wellness. Knowing how it can provide and harm us indicates we’ll be better ready when it bursts up in our life.

The benefit of embarrassment, however, might rely on who is viewing. Anja Eller, PhD, an affiliate lecturer of social psychology at the National Autonomous University of Mexico, has found that individuals are more likely to be uncomfortable when they err right in front of associates of their own social circle. Everyone is less uncomfortable when strangers see them fail, especially when the strangers are seen as lower in position.

Example: shopping for contraceptives. Scholars at Duke University found that buying contraceptives often brings about embarrassment, potentially putting individuals at risk of STI’s and unwanted child birth if they are too shocked to take the prophylactics through the checkout counter. That’s just one of many illustrations of embarrassment impacting our well-being. Men may fall short to get prostate examinations, women could miss mammograms, elderly people may prevent using assistive hearing devices, and individuals of all lines might fall short to bring up uncomfortable symptoms or put off going to the doctor completely.

Psychology Definition

Psychology is an educational and applied self-discipline that includes the study of emotional features and habits. Psychology has the immediate goal of understanding individuals and groups by both developing general principles and studying specific cases and by many accounts; it ultimately is designed to benefit a community. In this field, a professional specialist or researcher is called a psychologist, and can be categorized as a public, behavioral, or intellectual researcher. Specialists attempt to understand the role of emotional features in individual and public actions, while also discovering the physical and neurobiological procedures that underlie certain intellectual features and habits.

Psychologists discover principles such as understanding, knowledge, attention, feelings, phenomenology, inspiration, mind function, character, actions, and cultural connections. Specialists of different lines also consider the subconscious mind. Specialists employ medical techniques to infer causal and co relational connections between psychosocial factors. In addition, or in resistance to employing medical and deductive techniques, some, especially medical and guidance psychologists at times depend upon representational presentation and other inductive techniques. Psychology has been described as a “hub science”, with emotional conclusions connecting to research and viewpoints from the public sciences, natural sciences, medicine, and the humanities, such as philosophy.

Educational psychology is the study of how people learn in educational configurations, the potency of educational treatments, the mindset of training, and the social mindset of educational institutions as companies. The work of child specialists such as Lev Vygotsky, Jean Piaget, Bernard Luskin, and Jerome Bruner has been powerful in creating training techniques and academic methods. Educational psychology is often included in instructor teaching programs in places such as North America, Modern Australia, and New Zealand. University specialists are trained in educational and behavior evaluation, involvement, avoidance, and appointment, and many have comprehensive training in research.