Major Responsibilities of LPNs

Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) monitor the patient, seriously injured, convalescent and handicapped in many different health care settings like hospitals. In some states they are known as Licensed Vocational Nurses (LVNs).

LPNs/LVNs provide hands-on care to patients under the direction of RNs or medical doctors. LPN prep programs include a year of education at a healthcare facility, vocational-tech school or community college. Once they meet the education, students are then qualified for licensure as an LPN or LVN. Once certified, they are allowed to work at a hospital.

Licensed-Practical-NurseLPNs’ duties are restricted and they also have to work under the direction and supervision of a registered nurse or doctor. Most LPNs deliver standard bedside care. They get vital signs like temperature, blood pressure level, heartbeat and respiration. They also prepare and provide injections, apply dressings, provide alcohol rubs and massage therapy, use ice packs and keep track of catheters.

LPNs monitor patients and document complications or adverse reactions to medicines or treatments. They gather samples for assessment. They also execute routine laboratory tests; give food to patients and fluid intake. They assist patients with bathing, dressing and individual hygiene, they help keep them secure and care for their psychological needs. In states in which the law permits, they may provide prescribed medicines or commence intravenous fluids.

The majority of LPNs in hospitals and nursing homes work for 40-hour week, but due to the fact patients need around-the-clock care, some work nights, holidays and weekends. They frequently stand for very long periods and assist patients to move in bed, stand or stroll. Their job is physically and mentally demanding but may open doors for career development and satisfaction.

LPN Challenges

Licensed practical nurses (LPNs) are a few of the most crucial individuals in the nursing care field. They assist the RNs with their tasks and make their job a lot easier and improve the quality of services. However, LPNs do face certain challenges once they make an effort to execute their jobs. A few of these challenges are the effects of the legalities of nursing. LPNs are restricted with what they are should do, which sometimes make challenges for an LPN who needs to rely on the RN for a lot of things.

LPNOne of the difficulties for LPNs, particularly in this tight job economy, is locating a spot to work. Many hospitals restrict their employment to registered nurses alone, which is frustrating for LPNs who wish to operate in acute care settings. Some hospitals do hire LPNs, usually in roles which have less authority and therefore task-oriented.

LPNs will find jobs in nursing homes, however they don’t have the authority, and they will still work under the supervision of a registered nurse. Again, the LPN might be reduced to roles like medication nurse or treatment nurse rather than getting full care of the patients. Some centers, like dialysis facilities only hire RNs to operate the dialysis machine and care for patients. For many LPNs, this lack of diversity in job possibilities could be a challenge.

LPNs are frequently restricted with what they are able to do because, legally, they are bound with the task of delegation. An LPN cannot assess, identify or evaluate care since this is the job of the RN. Sometimes, this is often frustrating to have an LPN who may have heard what must be done and can’t really get it done. An LPN may even disagree with their supervisory RN, and can be powerless to alter the duties they’re assigned to accomplish.

This concern is surmountable, though you can’t alter the laws and regulations regarding patient care, however, you can cultivate a good working relationship with the RN, to supply the very best care for that patient. Simply because an LPN is assigned a particular task it doesn’t mean that she or he can’t do anything like when a patient is getting breathless. When the assigned RN does nothing or ignores the problem, the LPN can assist the patient. Despite the fact that LPNs are technically beneath the RN within the chain of command, they are able to still impact a patient’s care.

In certain situations, an LPN with two decades of experience will discover that the new grad nurse is their supervisor. This can be a challenging situation since the LPN likely knows a little more about patients, their diseases and just how to perform than an RN who has limited experience. Again, it’s a legal anomaly that needs the RN to delegate towards the LPN. If the RN doesn’t have a good deal of experience, an LPN must understand how to approach the problem.

Communication between your RN and LPN is essential towards the proper care of the individual. An LPN who assumes that the RN knows what they’re doing can harm the patient. An LPN must be a good communicator along with a nurse who understands how to manage people. Good communication will resolve this issue and will improve the quality of the health care.