Improving Patient Care

dlsIn today’s time, hospital organizations and other health leaders across the globe were being challenged with an increasing number of patient complaints related to ineffective patient care. They also received reports saying that there are some rude medical professionals who don’t want to provide health services to those unfortunate people. Because of these reports, health leaders have come up with some ideas on how to improve patient care to avoid negative reports and dissatisfaction from patients.

In this article, we will talk about effective guidelines on how to improve patient care within the society, community and hospital settings.

Continuous assessment
Doctors and nurses should conduct continuous health assessment to the patient by visiting them 3 to 4 times a day. By doing this, patients will regain their trust over them.

Proper communication
To have a smooth and peaceful relationship, medical professionals should always communicate well with their patients. Patients have low self-esteem; they wanted to be treated like what their mothers do to them. In order to provide the best patient care, talk to them modestly, give them accurate instructions.

Don’t let them wait
One of the most common patient complaints is that they wait for too long just to get the attention and care of the physician. Doctors and nurses should not let their patient wait and treat them as soon as possible. However, due to shortages of medical staffs, they cannot immediately attend to the needs of the patients. In order to prevent dissatisfaction and complaints, doctors and nurses should give patients definite and accurate time of service.

These three simple tips to improve patient care experience are much less difficult to follow. Patients who suffer from illnesses don’t have longer patience to understand the medical team. Doctors and nurses plead to provide highest care to patients who are in need.

Improving Patient Care with Technology

Citizens at the Kane Regional Centers will soon have a new friend in the physician’s office: “Telly,” a tele-presence digi-cam rig that can connect to a remote doctor and gather healthcare details during exams. The rig is part of a UPMC-run program called RAVEN or Initiative to Reduce Avoidable Hospitalizations Using evidence-based Interventions for Nursing Facilities in Western Pennsylvania, which is financed by a $19 million grant from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

patient_care“Bringing tele-medicine to the Kane Centers will enhance the speed and performance of patient care with which residents receive healthcare consultations when there is a change in their health,” Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald said. “It will also slow up the need to transport residents to a medical center or E.R., which is difficult for some of them.” “Telly” will not substitute doctors, who will still perform routine exams. It’ll only be used when an individual’s condition changes, along with a shift in breathing, heart function or pain. The robot-like rig will be monitored by physicians and can examine the eyes, ears, nasal area, neck, respiratory system, heart, stomach, skin, arms and legs and neurological system.

The rig looks like a pc monitor on wheels with a digi-cam secured on top. It comes equipped with tools like a wireless stethoscope, which can pass on details to a doctor at another location. Close relatives will be able to listen in via PC and telephone. “We recognize that a patient’s doctor or health professional specialist is sometimes not available at the skilled nursing facility to assess and treat the citizen when there is a change in their usual health,” Kane Executive Director Dennis Biondo said. “The goal is to provide ongoing access to high-quality patient care and health-care professionals.”

Patient Care and Staff Recognition

All staff, from administrators to porters, needs to experience recognition, thanks and support for the work they do. Yet far too few organizations truly pay attention to their staff or acknowledge the significance of their experience. Even less act upon what they hear to make staff feel it is worth speaking out, worth raising their head above the parapet to state that employment levels are risky or that they are being harassed. We need to pay attention to staff better and act upon what they say if we want them to feel respected, remain in their selected career and provide sympathetic patient care.

Patient_CareThe majority of people get into professional doctor and nurse education and learning inspired by principles and a sense of altruism, at least originally, but these features can become worn away eventually by the requirements of the program and the job. There are particular difficulties associated with working with, and directly caring for, sufferers or patient care in other words. We ask them to do this all day, every day, in a fast moving atmosphere where they often feel unrecognized and in need of support and where some will encounter great stress and feel burnt out. It is little wonder that some units have problems with staff revenues and recruiting.

The patient care work has found that sympathetic high ideals and principles, held dear by graduating learners, can become discontinued and mashed, with nursing staff confirming some degree of burn out within two years of certification. Across all staff groups, the requirements of patient care work mean that cynicism can develop and staff can become less understanding and more distant from their sufferers.  It is therefore crucial to secure staff from the problems of patient care work. Everyone needs support and restoration.

Optimizing Patient Care and Safety

Rideout Health, a non-profit community-based healthcare program, and RGP Healthcare™, a department of Resources Global Professionals (NASDAQ: RECN), declared that Rideout has selected and is applying Pavisse™,  a cutting-edge technology for tracking and guaranteeing individual protection. Rideout operates facilities and services located throughout Yuba, Sutter and The state of Nevada counties. They include acute-care healthcare centers Rideout Memorial and Fremont Medical Center; the Heart Center at Rideout; the Rideout Cancer Center, associated with UC Davis Medical Center; out-patient primary and specialized treatment centers and a host of additional services, such as senior living services, home health, hospice and durable healthcare equipment.

Pavisse, developed by RGP Healthcare, is a new extensive occurrence control solution designed to help healthcare centers manage individual safety, individual privacy and other compliance-related functions across the enterprise. “We will be one of the first healthcare centers in the Sacramento region to set up this software,” said Istikram Qaderi, M.D., Senior V.P. and Chief Quality Officer at Rideout. “We’ll first set up Pavisse at Rideout Memorial and once the program is running nicely, we’ll look to using it at other locations in our organization to help us continually monitor and improve the superiority of our patient care, which is always our priority.”

PatientCareDr. Qaderi, a former physician, moved his career focus recently to helping healthcare and patient care organizations work with doctors and other staff to arrange clinical care and patient-centered solutions in applications for performance improvement. He has spoken and published substantially on subjects such as quality, doctor and team engagement, safety, individual fulfillment, performance quality and culture change. Dr. Qaderi sees RGP Healthcare President Radgia Cook as an “innovator” in patient safety and incident control and further described the Pavisse product as life changing. “Pavisse is just one of several state-of-the-art tools we will use to deliver on this objective,” Dr. Qaderi said. “It is extensive, user-friendly, and easy to set up and personalized to each facility’s needs. And RGP professionals are available to help us reap the most benefit.”

Said Cook, “Rideout Health is just the type of forward-thinking partner we sought. We are thrilled about integrating with Rideout Health as they continue to serve as a national model for the delivery of quality healthcare.”