Humanities CLEP Examination FAQs

The Humanities evaluation assesses common knowledge of fictional works, art, and songs and the other performing arts. It is wide in its coverage, with concerns on all times from traditional to modern and in many different fields: poems, writing, philosophy, art, architecture, songs, dance, theater and film. The evaluation needs applicants to show their knowledge of the humanities through memory of particular details, understanding and application of ideas and research and presentation of various performing arts.

humanitiesBecause the examination is very wide in its coverage, it is unlikely that any one person will be well advised about all the areas it includes. The examination contains roughly 140 questions to be answered in 90 minutes. Some of these are pretest concerns that will not be obtained. Any time applicants spend on guides or providing personal details is in addition to the real examining time.

For applicants with acceptable ratings on the Humanities evaluation, universities may allow up to six semester hours (or the equivalent) of credit toward fulfillment of a submission requirement. Some may allow credit for a particular course that suits the examination in content. This evaluation uses the date designations b.c.e (before the common era) and c.e. (common era). These brands match to b.c. (before Christ) and a.d. (anno Domini), which are used in some books.

Questions on the Humanities evaluation need applicants to show the capabilities detailed below, in the estimated rates indicated. Some concerns may need more than one of the capabilities.

  • Knowledge of real details (authors, works, etc.) (50 % of the examination)
  • Recognition of methods such as rhyme scheme, method, and matters of style, and the capability to recognize them as features of certain authors, performers, educational institutions, or periods (30 % of the examination)
  • Understanding and presentation of fictional paragraphs and art copies that is likely to be different to most applicants (20 % of the examination).

Humanities Crisis

“Crisis” and “decline” are the terms of the day in conversations of the humanities. A primary stimulus for the issue is a stunning factoid: only 8% of undergraduates major in humanities. But this number is deceiving. It does not consist of degrees in carefully relevant areas such as history, literature and some of the social sciences. Nor does it take consideration of the many needed and optional humanities programs learners take outside their degrees. Most essential, the 8% contains only those with a serious educational interest in literary works, songs and art, not those dedicated to generating the creative works that humanists study.

humanities_crisisOnce we identify that deeply caring about the humanities (including the arts) does not need specializing in philosophy, English or foreign languages, it’s not at all apparent that there is a crisis of interest in the humanities, at least in our colleges. Is the crisis rather one of severe financial reality? Humanities degrees on average start making $31,000 per year and shift to a normal of $50,000 in their middle years. (The numbers for authors and executing performers are much reduced.) By comparison, company degrees begin with incomes 26% greater than humanities degrees and shift to incomes 51% greater.

But this information does not show that business degrees generate more because they majored in business. Business degrees may well be more enthusiastic about making profits and so agree to jobs that pay well even if they are not otherwise satisfying, whereas individuals enthusiastic about the humanities and the arts may be willing to take more satisfying but lower-paying jobs. Higher education teachers, for example, often know that they could have made far more if they had gone to law school or gotten an M.B.A., but are willing to agree to considerably reduced pay to teach a topic they enjoy.

Humanities and Education

“What’s the objective of learning the humanities: literary works, ‘languages’, philosophy, history and the arts?” You see, hordes of directors orchestrating the financing and therefore developing the framework of college have insisted that it’s essential to develop our universities around the study of “useful” topics, mainly math, chemistry and the managing of international currency, to the near exemption of the humanities. I do not think it’s such a hot idea.

humanitiesAdministrators who market education as a ticket to success instead of interpreting it as process to learning are, basically, suggesting for the training of employees rather than for the training and learning of people. Of course we want our children to discover useful and successful work when they graduate from college, if indeed they are lucky enough to have been able to be present at one. But, we also need to remember that a real education is not simply the acquisition of a set of skills. Each of us, regardless of birth or class, should get to be part of the bigger discussion that life provides. Ever pay attention to what the people who really run things discuss? CEOs, CFOs, political figures from all parties, designers of both ball gowns and software, lyricists, technicians, physicians, art gallery curators and manufacturers of non-reality-based TV programming? They do not talk about work: They find mutual understanding in life. They talk about books, movies, art, music and poems. Maybe they talk about the roller derby; it depends on the audience. You will find physicians studying Alice Munro and technicians grieving the loss of Lou Reed while comparing him to Leonard Cohen.

And there is another reason to study poetry: As one sincere buddy announced, the study of literary works can be validated by the fact that nobody ever thrilled a lady by reciting a formula. Public universities and colleges are in particular risk of contorting and, at their most severe moments, crippling their student body if they define themselves as merely a way for learners to get better jobs. In such a caged perspective, universities are in risk of becoming service institutions: We will train the Workers of the World, sure, only we will not give them anything in the humanities to merge them, motivate them, sensitize them or enlighten them.