A Few Things to Remember Before CLEP

clepStudents who are decided to take the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) can save both time and money. CLEP is a credit-by-exam program designed to give students flexibility in earning a college degree. In return, many students are availing the said program because it enables them to study at their own pace.

Administered by the College Board, the College Level Examination Program is designed to speed up the process of education. Students can now study without worrying about the extended time they are given inside a university.

But before pursuing CLEP, a student has to consider certain rules or questions about CLEP to be able to assess whether this program works for him/her. They should take heed of these rules.

The first rule is to know how these credits are applied. It would be safe to say that a student needs to see if the college or university of his/her choice awards credit for CLEP. There are some universities that consider transferring credit but they will not use the maximum courses available. In some cases, if they have many credits in transfer, he may not be able to use CLEP. The student will not be given a choice which credit will be accepted.

Next, they need to ask how many credits the student can earn. The choices vary from 12 to 60, although other schools can include AP credits in the cap. Also, the student should be able to determine their long term plans, if there is any. There are considerations when it comes to CLEP. There are schools in the US that need more hours of studying before moving on to a higher level of learning.

Lastly, they should know their limitations. Only self-motivated and independent learners deal with CLEP better than anybody. Students who find it hard taking standardized tests should think twice before pursuing CLEP.

College Level Examination Program and Home Schooling

Google “home schooling” and you’re rewarded with 4,130,000 results in less than one second. While home schooling is a colossal subject both on-line and off, the discussion has a tendency to wind down a bit as youngsters get more established and secondary school approaches not too far off. Maybe it’s because of the expanding intricacy of the topic, or maybe assets or eagerness reduce. Be that as it may, for a developing number of families, home schooling throughout the secondary school years is a suitable and sought after elective to customary schooling.  One verifiable profit of a home schooling is that it might be totally redone to fit your kid’s identity, calendar, accessibility and hobbies. Offering people a differing extent of training alternatives is a grand objective regardless of how kids are instructed and with home schooling specifically, folks can work together with their adolescents to make the best experience possible.

CLEPEach one state has distinctive laws in regards to home instruction. A few states are truly remiss on their home schooling prerequisites, while others have exceptionally particular enrollment alternatives and may even oblige you to show confirmation of your advancement, educational module and testing all around the year. It’s dependent upon you to do your homework and determine your state’s prerequisites. Even while your home schooler is finishing secondary school courses, he or she could be planning for college. On the off chance that your student is looking to get ahead of the game, sway them to “test out” of courses in which they can demonstrate mastery. The cost savings will be huge!

A CLEP exam tests mastery of school level material gained in a mixed bag of ways, through general academic instructions, critical free study or extracurricular work. Self-taught learners are perfect competitors for a college level examination program exam, as are grown-ups coming back to school and military staff entering school after serving their nation, among others. College level examination program is the most broadly acknowledged credit-by-examination program, accessible at more than 2,900 universities and colleges and regulated at in excess of 1,800 test centers. For a small amount of the expense of a school course, an individual can take a CLEP exam and get school credit before they ever enter the holy corridors of higher learning!

College Level Examination Program News

Though learners are given the opportunity to earn credit before college, some credits might not be transferable to Northwest. The College Level Examination Program provides many different choices for learners to get credit without getting a formal course. Students at Northwest are permitted to take these assessments for certain subjects detailed in the yearly catalog. There are several programs provided that learners can test out of, a few examples being American Government, financial accounting, college algebra and western civilization.

CLEP“In the catalog, there are certain scores we need,” said Tamera Grow, associate director of admissions. “These (in the catalog) are the ones that have been analyzed in the past by our teachers. It reveals the ranking that is required to get the credit for the classes that are here.” There are no specifications learners need to fulfill to take this test. Freshmen through seniors are able to test out of programs using College Level Examination Program. However, though many learners think this program is a simple and fast way to generate credit, some programs detailed in the catalog as having the test-out choice are not approved at all at Northwest.

“If a college student had another (subject), we could have it analyzed,” Grow said. “I think this is a traditional record of what has been done in the past. I have not gone through all College Level Examination Program choices in the last few years to say ‘OK, this is the one that we should do.’ I have just kind of left it up, but if we got a demand, I could look at it.” Each test costs learners $100, said Beth Mason, assessment office administrator. Of that, $80 goes to the CLEP examining company and the other $20 invested on the 90 minute test is kept by Northwest. Students may not have obtained credit for certain subjects at Northwest for a few reasons: They could have not scored well enough for the Northwest specifications, or the individual departments at Northwest may not think the credit is worthy of passing.

College Level Examination Program Purpose

CLEP (College Level Examination Program) is a program developed to provide learners possibilities to obtain higher education degree credit for certain academic places of study by testing their knowledge through specific placement assessments. CLEP is the abbreviation for College Level Examination Program. CLEP is developed for learners to accomplish higher education credit by passing exams for the appropriate undergrad college programs. Most institutions provide credit and/or placement for passing CLEP exams provided by the College Board.

CLEP-TitleCLEP exams involve a sequence of multiple-choice questions that are evaluated on a range of 20-80. Most institutions consider a score of 50 a passing grade. However, some academic institutions provide more or less credit according to your ranking and the subject. For example, a score of 50 in Spanish might compensate 6 credits to a college student while a grade of 65 might give 12 credits. Consult with a consultant or CLEP professional at your preferred university to find out the range of credit given for a particular discipline.

As of 2007, CLEP exams are provided in the following areas:

Business

  • Financial Accounting
  • Intro Business Law
  • Information Systems & Computer Applications
  • Principles of Management
  • Principles of Marketing

Composition & Literature

  • American Literature
  • Analyzing & Interpreting Literature
  • English Composition
  • English Literature
  • Freshman College Composition
  • Humanities

Foreign Languages

  • (Check with the school for foreign language CLEP exams offered)

History & Social Sciences

  • American Government
  • Intro to Educational Psychology
  • History of the United States I, II (Early Colonization to 1877 / 1877 to Present)
  • Human Growth & Development
  • Principles of Macroeconomics
  • Principles of Microeconomics
  • Intro to Psychology
  • Social Sciences & History
  • Intro to Sociology
  • Western Civilization I, II (Ancient Near East to 1648 / 1648 to Present)

Science & Mathematics

  • Biology
  • Calculus
  • Chemistry
  • College Algebra
  • College Mathematics
  • Pre-calculus
  • Natural Sciences